5.7% of Autistic Children Struggle with Gender Identity

Survey data from Autism Parenting Magazine reveals almost 6% of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have some form of gender dysphoria.

Some experts believe people on the spectrum are naturally more nuanced, while others say it’s a result of gender fluidity gaining increasing coverage in the media.”

— Emily Ansell Elfer

LONDON, UK, October 7, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — Autism Parenting Magazine (APM) sent a survey to more than 160,000 email subscribers around the world, gathering exclusive insight into gender and autism.

When asked “Is your child struggling with their gender identity?” 5.7% of respondents answered “Yes”.

These respondents were then posed further questions. 50% stated their child’s gender confusion started at age 10 or older, 33.3% said signs appeared under five years old, and the remaining 16.7% selected age five to 10 years.

APM asked what pronouns these children prefer to use. A significant 17.6% selected the gender neutral pronoun “They”. Meanwhile, 59.6% stated “He” or “She” but only 17.6% of these use the pronoun they were assigned at birth. The remaining 5.4% gave other responses (with many of these stating their child is nonverbal).

Only 4.5% of those surveyed administer puberty blocker medication, but 20% stated they would consider using puberty blockers in the future.

APM’s final question was: “Do you know other families with autistic children experiencing gender dysphoria?” A significant 34.8% replied “Yes”.

“When our survey results are compared to DSM-5 data stating gender dysphoria is present in 0.005–0.014% of biological males and 0.002–0.003% of biological females globally, it seems gender is a significant topic in the autism community​​,” said Emily Ansell Elfer, Editor of Autism Parenting Magazine.

“The reasons for this are a matter for debate. Some experts believe people on the spectrum are naturally more nuanced, while others say it’s a result of gender fluidity gaining increasing coverage in the media.”

More information on APM’s findings as well as an infographic showing the main survey results can be found here.

Emily Ansell Elfer
Autism Parenting Magazine
+44 20 3290 9176
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Source: EIN Presswire